Home » Places of Pain: Forced Displacement, Popular Memory and Trans-Local Identities in Bosnian War-Torn Communities by Hariz Halilovich
Places of Pain: Forced Displacement, Popular Memory and Trans-Local Identities in Bosnian War-Torn Communities Hariz Halilovich

Places of Pain: Forced Displacement, Popular Memory and Trans-Local Identities in Bosnian War-Torn Communities

Hariz Halilovich

Published August 1st 2015
ISBN : 9781782387626
Paperback
288 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Honorable Mention 2013 PROSE Awards, Archaeology and Anthropology sectionScholars of transnational migration and diaspora will find in this book a compelling exploration of the day-to-day practices of translocalism. What is most valuable inMoreHonorable Mention 2013 PROSE Awards, Archaeology and Anthropology sectionScholars of transnational migration and diaspora will find in this book a compelling exploration of the day-to-day practices of translocalism. What is most valuable in Halilovichs approach is that it encourages analysis of both homogeneous national and religious groups and heterogeneous multiethnic collectives in empirical, rather than essentialist or ideological, terms. By de-emphasizing the traditional or official markers of difference in Bosnia, Halilovich sheds light on how collective identities may be fostered through shared attachment to places remembered, imagined, and real. . Slavic ReviewIn his study of Bosnia and Herzegovinas legacy of forced migration, Hariz Halilovich takes us on a powerful, at times heartwrenching, journey into the lives, memories, and communities of the wars displaced...[It] represents an important contribution to the anthropological scholarship of the region, forced migration, and transnationalism. Halilovich has done a masterful job in leading us through critical, underexamined interstices of pain and place that so forcefully define the experiences of Bosnias displaced persons. . American AnthropologistThis is one of the most powerful accounts - the most powerful account by a survivor - of the impact of forced displacement in the wake of the Bosnian conflict...The book is a survivors account and at the same time a scholarly critique of what happened. It is an exemplar of engaged and informed writing: moving and informative, evocative and profound. It is a deeply serious book, but with the light touch of an accomplished writer. . Ron Adams, Victoria UniversityThis title addressed the complexity of lives of the Bosnian diaspora and issues of the trans-local identities like no other book before. The fact that the author has himself experienced the war and the refugee experience, as well as demonstrated the awareness of the process of forging his own new-old identity, contributes greatly to the quality of this book. . Edina Becirevic, University of SarajevoThis is a first-class text, covering a hitherto neglected topic. It is original and of a very high intellectual standard. It is crisply written, well structured, based on extensive primary research and guided by a solid theoretical understanding...there are very few English-language books in this field that really impress me, but this is one of them. . Marko Hoare, Kingston University, UKFor displaced persons, memory and identity is performed, (re)constructed and (re)negotiated daily. Forced displacement radically reshapes identity, with results ranging from successful hybridization to feelings of permanent misplacement. This compelling and intimate description of places of pain and (be)longing that were lost during the 1992-95 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as of survivors places of resettlement in Australia, Europe and North America, serves as a powerful illustration of the complex interplay between place, memory and identity. It is even more the case when those places have been vandalized, divided up, brutalized and scarred. However, as the author shows, these places of humiliation and suffering are also places of desire, with displaced survivors emulating their former homes in the far corners of the globe where they have resettled.Hariz Halilovich, social anthropologist and writer, is a Senior Lecturer at Monash University, Melbourne. He has been recipient of a number of prestigious awards, including best short story at the Australian National Writing Awards (2001).