Home » The Ninth Year of a Deaf Childs Life: A Thesis Accepted by the Faculty of the University of Minnesota for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy by Alice J Mott
The Ninth Year of a Deaf Childs Life: A Thesis Accepted the Faculty of the University of Minnesota for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy by Alice J Mott

The Ninth Year of a Deaf Childs Life: A Thesis Accepted

the Faculty of the University of Minnesota for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy by Alice J Mott

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331281528
Paperback
116 pages
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 About the Book 

Excerpt from The Ninth Year of a Deaf Childs Life: A Thesis Accepted by the Faculty of the University of Minnesota for the Degree of Doctor of PhilosophyBefore discussing this position it is proper that I should define the term Deaf, as I use it.MoreExcerpt from The Ninth Year of a Deaf Childs Life: A Thesis Accepted by the Faculty of the University of Minnesota for the Degree of Doctor of PhilosophyBefore discussing this position it is proper that I should define the term Deaf, as I use it.It is a word liable to much confusion of meaning - varying from its application to persons who have become hard of hearing with age, to those who have been totally deaf from infancy. With as much consistency as possible I apply it only to the latter class. The possession of hearing for the first four or five years of life, long enough to admit of the acquirement of speech and language, virtually removes an individual from the ranks of deaf-muteism, beyond recall. The following pages concern themselves only with the deaf who have never, within their own recollection, been anything but deaf.The mass of Adult Deaf - that is of persons who were born deaf or became so in infancy - form a people solitary, apart from the hearing world. This separation, however, I maintain is social and intellectual, not industrial and moral.The simple fact that the tenth United States Census revealed the presence of but four deaf persons in our jails, prisons and almshouses, while the eleventh Census increases the number but to 114, seems ample evidence of the exceptional morality of the Deaf as a class.Their industrial character follows as a warrantable assumption: If they were not usefully employed somewhere, they would find their way into the proverbial haunts of the idle and unprofitable.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.